City Journal Spring 2014

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Chris Reed
Will the Golden State Go Brown? « Back to Story

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"Perhaps more than in any other state, aggressive environmentalism is accepted as the norm in California."

Environmentalism, as practiced by the liberals, is trendy hypocrisy. It is the religion of the comfortable, and the theology of the convenient.
For someone that knows nothing about oil & gas this might sound like a big deal. Maybe not.

We have shale gas coming out the wazoo. Number of fields sit idea because of price. Given stricter regulation, higher costs and anti business climate, don't see anyone drilling for shale gas in California. Formation would have to be very, very good to overcome the negatives.

As for shale oil, only 2 shale oil formations are productive, Bakken in ND and Eagle Ford in Texas. Some might work out in west Texas under permian. Dozens of so called shale oil plays just never worked out.

Lots of trouble and very expensive to "work out" shale formation, as they are all different. Why spend the money and time in California when they could change rules on you at any time. Why not just find a formation in Texas or Oklahoma.
Given the intense opposition from environmental groups, who are an important part of the Democrat coalition, it is unlikely that California will ever go forward with fracking. Even if approved, legal challenges can prevent fracking for years.

On th eother hand, if California continues to become ever more Latino there is a chance you may see fracking - the environmental movement is, at least in my state, and I believe in California as well,an almost exclusively white club. Once real power passes to Latinos in California, they may put forth a different agenda entirely when it comes to the environment. And that means fracking goes forward.

If Latinos and those in the environmental movement go head to head, things may get interesting indeed, as it always does when two Democratic groups find themselves at each others throats.
Governor Brown was always more awesome than CJ gave him credit for over the last three years. He is one of America's best governors.
Thanks Chris for the heads-up and sorry to hear it's happening in California thanks to the greed-heads [see: Lord Buckley]. I was born in San Diego, 1936, and raised in La Mesa (Helix High) but currently living in Charlottesville Virginia.

Hope you all can turn this fracking crap around.

Best,

Dick
The California legislature passed a law requiring the state's utilities to derive one-third of their power from renewable sources by 2020. That might be easier than it sounds, since California already gets 17% of its power from renewable sources especially hydroelectric (source, Cal. Energy Commission). Yet, California residential electric rates are already 33% higher than Nevada's and 44% higher than Arizona's (source, Institute for Energy Research). If fracking does release large amounts of natural gas, it is possible that Californians won't allow themselves to use it to generate cheap electricity but will transmit it out of state. One thing they could do with it is use it for vehicle fuel, since compressed natural gas is a clean-burning fuel and requires little refining. It requires relatively little modification of cars to make them run on compressed natural gas, so CNG cars are cheaper than hybrids or plug-in electrics. If the Californians resort to fracking, the gas they gather may well go into their vehicles as well as out of state utilities.